Archive for March, 2007

CPI(Maoist) Central Committee : Let us turn every SEZ into a battlezone like Nandigram !

March 27, 2007

Source:the-marxist.blogspot.com


Communist Party of India (Maoist)

Central Committee

March 15, 2007

Let us wage a united militant struggle to throw out the Social-Fascist Government in West Bengal led by Bengal Dyer Buddhadeb!

Let us turn every SEZ into a Battle Zone like

Nandigram!!

The massacre of at least 16 peasants (which could actually be higher than 50) and causing injuries to over a hundred people in Nandigram by Buddhadeb’s Hitlerite police force-CPI(M)’s social-fascist armed goons on March 14 brings into one’s mind the ghastly massacre in Jallianwalabagh by the bloodthirsty general Dyer during the British colonial rule. Social-Fascist Buddhadeb has taken the mantle of butcher Dyer by sending over 5000-strong police force and hundreds of armed goons of his Party to pounce upon the peaceful protestors in the proposed SEZ of Nandigram in East Midnapore in order to pave the way for transforming West Bengal into a safe haven for the imperialist MNCs, big Corporate houses, and unscrupulous land mafia. The fleeing people, including women, were chased and killed by these neo-fascist armed gangsters in a way similar to the acts carried out by Hindu chauvinist gangs in Gujarat.

Operation Bloodbath’ at Nandigram is a meticulously planned conspiracy hatched by Buddhadeb’s CPI(M) and Sonia’s UPA government at the Centre in consultation with the big industrial sharks and their imperialist mentors. The worst part of this heart-chilling episode is that Buddhadeb and Prakash Karat had repeatedly assured the people that the proposed SEZ in Nandigram would be shelved and shifted elsewhere if the people did not want it. They had assured that notification for the acquisition of 14,000 acres of land was being withdrawn. Now it has become clear that these double-dealers, like Goebbels, had only used this as a ruse to buy time, and had never any intention to shift the SEZ. Nine peasants were killed in the past few weeks prior to the March 14 massacre In order to serve the MNCs and the industrial houses the so-called Left Front government had decided to seize the multi-crop land of the peasants and build SEZs over the grave-yards of the protesting people. The blood of women and children that flowed in the fields of Nandigram thoroughly exposes the “Left” rhetoric and round-the-clock demagogy by political brokers like Sitaram Yechuri, Brinda Karat, Raghavulu and so on. They organize protests for building their vote bank where they are in opposition but kill the protesting people where they are in power.

Nandigram has proved even to a layman that the rhetoric of these social-fascists is no different from that of National Socialism of Adolf Hitler. Yechuri’s shameless defence of the gory massacre by placing the blame for the violence on the Trinamool and the Maoists is an eye-opener to all those who still believe in the socialist rhetoric of these traitors and goons in the guise of so-called Left. This social-fascist and the most trusted political broker for the imperialists and the Indian Big Business claimed that his “Left” Front government in West Bengal is trying to resolve the issue politically but “outsiders” such as Maoists were trying to incite the people of Nandigram and that the helpless policemen had to fire in self-defence. This hypocrite cannot fool the people by trying to hush up the stark fact that his Party goons and thousands of policemen were sent deliberately to massacre the peaceful protesters, that all those murdered through this state-sponsored terrorism were local peasants including several women, and that this most despicable and bizarre act was carried out to resolve a political movement through the most brutal means. This Indian offspring of Goebbels cannot fool the people through such lies and falsehood to justify the unprovoked firing on the people. The bloodbath of March 14 reveals in naked colours the cruelty and inhumanity of the so-called reforms with a human face peddled by Yechuris, Karats and the like and their fake opposition to the neoliberal policies of privatization-liberalisation-globalisation. No wonder, Ambanis, Tatas, Mittals, Essar Ruias and the imperialist MNCs and the World Bank are itching to bring these social-fascists to power at the Centre as they have proved themselves to be the most loyal servants and their social base can serve to enact social-fascism to suppress people’s struggles.

Today the reactionary ruling classes of the country are bent upon transforming vast tracts of fertile agricultural land into neo-colonial enclaves even if it means enacting blood-baths all over the country. Thousands of crores of rupees have already flown from the big business and imperialist MNCs into the coffers of the Congress, CPI(M) and other political parties. It is clear that the battle-lines are drawn for an uncompromising war between the haves and have-nots, between those who want to turn our mother-land into a haven for the international capital, the Indian big business and the handful of filthy rich on the one hand and the vast majority of the destitute, poverty-stricken masses, particularly the peasantry, on the other. There is no middle ground: either one is with the vast masses or with the filthy rich. 237 SEZs have already been approved and lakhs of acres of fertile agricultural land are being forcibly acquired by the various state and central governments. In Orissa, Jharkhand, Chattisgrah, AP, Maharashtra, Haryana, and several other states, lakhs of people are rendered homeless due to anti-people projects.


The CPI(Maoist) calls upon the oppressed masses, particularly the peasantry, to transform every SEZ into a battle-zone, to create Kalinga Nagars and Nandigrams everywhere, and to kick out the real outsiders—the rapacious MNCs, comprador big business houses, their dalals and the land mafia—who are snatching away their lands and all means of livelihood and colonizing the country. The CC, CPI(Maoist), vows to extend all support to the struggling masses, to intensify the struggle against all SEZs, and to avenge the massacre in Nandigram. The masses have the right to rebel against injustice, and how ever much Yechuris and Buddhadebs yelp about Maoist incitement, we openly declare to the world that we shall unite the vast masses and lead, participate and extend all support to the people and organizations of our country to unite and fight the imperialist onslaught through the SEZs that is being carried out through their Indian dalals in the Congress, BJP, CPI(M), Samajwadi Party, TDP, DMK, AIDMK and other political parties who are selling away our motherland. CPI(Maoist) calls upon the people of West Bengal to make the state bandh on March 16 a big success and continue the heroic struggle until the SEZs are withdrawn.

Azad,

Spokesperson,

Central Committee,

CPI(Maoist)

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Government Of India tries to put up a brave face as it fails to stop the rapid growth of the Revolutionary Maoist Movement in India

March 27, 2007

Why we have no answer to the Maoist Revolutionaries ?

Krishnakumar in Raipur | February 09, 2007 |

With most militant organisations, there is a clear understanding among the State’s agencies about what the outfits stand for, what their short term aims are and what their long term ambition is. But that’s not the case with the Maoists.

Simply put, very little is known as to just how Maoists have grown to such alarming proportions in recent years. So, when officers and officials from Maoist-hit states came together for a conference organised by the Institute for Conflict Management, to discuss strategies to combat the Maoist insurgency, a lot of time was dedicated to understanding how the organisation works and what its strategies are.

The high-level delegates of the conference put down the following as the strategies and the strengths of the Maoists.

Solid recruitment strategy:

Officials who have long been in the thick of Maoist insurgency say that the main ploy used by the outfit to recruit people is by catching them young. They say Maoists attract youngsters in the regions where they have considerable clout and involve them in some revolutionary activity.

Former minister in the Andhra Pradesh government Vijayarama Rao adds, “Wherever there is a discontentment, there will always be individuals, organisations and ideologies that will urge the use of violence to air their discontentment. That is what the Maoists are doing in most parts of the country today.”

Fight for popular causes:

The Maoists also take up popular issues of the common man and seek to project themselves as the key to a solution. “They protest against what they perceive to be injustices meted out to the common man.,” says Rao, who has also been the director of the Central Bureau of Investigation.

As a downside for the Maoists, there are not many students joining their ranks these days.

Srinivas Reddy, Senior Assistant Editor of The Hindu, Hyderabad, however says that they have begun to explore ways to figure out why.

“They have a beautiful name for it. ‘Social Investigation’ is what they call it. These days, there go out to the ground level and are trying to figure out why students are not joining them any more. And they have started tweaking their propaganda and tactic accordingly.”

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Organisational powers:

One main reason officers attribute to the rise of the outfit is their strong organisational assets. One officer from Andhra Pradesh who has been in the thick of the issue for a long time says their frontal organization is a bigger threat than their armed units. These frontal organizations are the ones who go to the ground level and shape public opinion.

“We need to device a clear strategy as to how we will counter the frontal organisations. They play a much more important role than what is thought to be,” the senior Andhra Pradesh officer warns.

Rajya Sabha member Arun Shourie agrees. Shourie says there is a very urgent need to examine the fontal organisations.
“Who are behind these organisations? It is the duty of both the government and the media to find out about the people who are behind these organisations and find out what their interests are,” he says.
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Propaganda:

One thing that all officers are unanimous about is the notion that the media lends a more sympathetic ear to the Maoists than to the State.

“The Maoists use the media and the intelligentsia to maximum benefit. A most wanted Maoist can sit in the comforts of his hideout and issue threats to the security forces and the politicians. There is nothing that anyone can do about it because the media is too eager to go in and have his version. Such things are of no value to the public. Neither are they in public interest,” an officer from Andhra fumes.
Maoist fighters march in a show of strength

Change according to times:

The modern day Maoist is tech savvy; has all the modern weapons and is just too well informed of the issues of the day. One senior police officer, without wanting to be named for this report, says, “We were shocked to find that they were using laptops, data cards and other gadgets with ease. Any modernisation you see in the force in that aspect is the result of us having merely followed them.”

Nor is the modern day Maoist going to the masses with issues like land reforms. “He talks about LPG prices, effects of globalization, multi-national companies, liberalization, The World Bank and the World Trade Organisation. They are taking up causes like real estate, SEZs and displacement,” says Srinivas Reddy.

Beyond all these, the main strength of the Maoists happens to be the biggest weakness of the State — a poor understanding of who the enemy is. During the course of the conference, one thing that the serving officers, analysts and the former officers failed to have a consensus on was about the motive of the Maoists.

While the serving officers — those who are in the middle of the rut, fighting it day in and day out — always invariably spoke of the Maoists as a military organisation. They saw them as a military outfit with territorial ambitions.

The former officers and top cops often described the Maoists as a political outfit driven blindly by ideology. The observers, analysts and the journalists — who too see the problem on a regular basis but as outsiders — felt they were a bit of both.

Shourie aptly summarized: “It is a political movement with military objectives. At the end of the day, they are all about dominance and control.”

The problem with the different perceptions is the perception of the men who are in the filed, locked in a combat with the Maoists. Whatever the retired officers and the experts say, at the end of the day, what matters most is how the serving officers see the problem.

Srinivas Reddy sums up: “Right now, the State is pitted against an invisible enemy, who is engaging them in an unconventional protracted armed struggle. And we must accept that we lag behind in specific areas and address them.”

Rediff

Revolutionary Youth Organisation Attacks Trichur Corporation

March 27, 2007

RYO ATTACK ON THE TRICHUR CORPORATION SECRETARY AGAINST IMPLEMENTATION OF A.D.B POLICIES IN CORPORATIONS

Members of revolutionary youth organization in Keralam attacked the Thrissur corporation secretary who is in charge of implementation of ADB (Asian Development Bank) agreement on Thrissur Corporation on the martyr day of Bhagat Singh.

A group of youths approached the corporation secretary and one gave him a pamphlet while others smashed the official vehicles, wrote slogans of ADB GO BACK in the vehicles and pour black paint on his name board. Mean time, other section distributed pamphlets in the just outside the same compound. They shouted slogans against the imperialist agreements especially against ADB agreement, distributed pamphlets and dispersed before the arrival of huge contingent of police forces.
There is a widespread dissatisfaction among the Kerala people against the dual stand of LDF, who took a stand against ADB agreement when they were in the opposition and when they came into rule they have given red carpet welcome for ADB and other imperialist institutions and programs.

The press release given by RYO blamed the Chief Minister Achuthanandan who had an image of hero of people’s struggles while he was the opposition leader, showed his real face of an imperialist servant. Now his government is going forward with all sorts of imperialist policies despite the strong protest from the progressive and democratic section of the Keralam.

Instead of collecting tax from the defaulting plantation monopolies and other imperialist compradors which comes approximately 10000 crores now the Government is taking 1200 crore rupees from the World Bank for rural water supply program and now from thousand crores from ADB also.
This is purely an imperialist conspiracy to burden the people with huge loans and exploiting them.

This shows that there is no difference between the policies of LDF Government and Congress, BJP governments. Nandigram is a latest example of this. Now the Left governments become dearer to the imperialists as they ensure efficient implementation of imperialist programs by effectively hushing up the rebellious sounds of the society with the help of their well organized goons and other machinery when they are in rule.

All the ruling class left parties like CPI, CPI (M) and their youth organizations degenerated to the good servants of imperialist programs. A section of intelligentsia is hopeful about a mere reformation of the conditions of the ADB and World Bank agreements. It will only serve the exploitation of the finance capital. Interestingly the same arguments were brought forwarded by the CPI (M) for bringing the FDI in Bengal and Keralam. We have to abolish all sort of imperialist capital from the Indian society for the well being of the toiling masses of our country. In this situation we have to follow the glowing path of anti imperialist struggles opened by the legendary heroes like Bhagat Singh and his comrades to defeat ADB and all the other imperialist institutions, agreements and programs.

Though this is only a symbolic struggle RYO calls on the youths of Keralam to unleash militant struggles like the roaring struggles of central and eastern parts of rural India to kick out imperialist capital from our country. This protest is only a small step to this direction. RYO secretary com. Ijas warns the LDf government that if they are planning to repeat Nandigram in Keralam, repressing democratic struggles with police bullets and cellars we will fight back against the imperialist policies with immense courage draw from the heroic struggles of Bhagat Singh and others.

Varavara Rao Quotes

March 27, 2007


“The CPM has become a mafia, first it served its own power interests but now it has employed itself for monopoly capital, it is as ruthless and arrogant as Narendra Modi,”
– Maoist intellectual Varavara Rao.

Nandigram Bengali Documentary Film

March 27, 2007

This film is about to people movement in Nandigram in West bengal(India). Nandigram is a rural area in Purba Medinipur district of the Indian state of West Bengal. It is located around 150 km from Kolkata.

Nandigram was the centre of civil unrest over a special economic zone, which the state government had proposed for the area. 160 people were killed at police firing nad over 200 are missing still. All killed were villegers, no police were among the dead. But this documentary film shows the movement in early stage, not the March incident.

The first few minutes show the police atrocities committed at Singur also..

There are no sub titles or translation and the entire video is
in bengali but one can still grasp what is being said without
knowing the language.
It has been made by people who are actually there at nandigram

Varavara Rao : ‘If the State is violent, there will be counter-violence’

March 27, 2007

‘If the State is violent, there will be counter-violence’

Revolutionary poet and ideologue Varavara Rao

varavara rao

How do you react when Maoists enact a brutal massacre such as this?

It is only the symptom of what is happening on the ground. The issue is simple. Multinationals are making huge inroads with the help of corrupt governments and contractors. The Maoists’ movement had stopped the mnc drain on the region’s resources, but of late they have begun to exploit the area again. In addition, the government is repressing people in the name of Salva Judum, which is nothing but a State-sponsored war upon the people. The media has reported more than 50 policemen killed in the incident, but do you know 39 of them were Salva Judum activists whom the government has armed and given uniforms?

Do you justify violence as a political tactic, though?

What is the option? You must ask this question to the State which is the main instrument of violence today. Those who stand up for the rights of the masses often have no recourse but to resist State violence; Maoists are indulging in counter-violence, that’s all, they have to defend themselves.

Is there a possibility they could give up arms and begin talks?

Again, ask the State. If it ends Salva Judum and the people of the area are allowed to return home safe, there will be a reduction in violence. But if the State continues to oppress people, there will be retaliation.

How do you respond to a ceasefire proposal?

Let the government declare it, the revolutionary movement will take a decision. More than 60 people were killed in Nandigram by the State and nobody calls that violence. These were people trying to protect their land and the police just butchered them. There is no outcry about that kind of violence. Why? When the State is so violent, there will be violence in society.

Where do you see the movement heading? Is there a goal in sight?

This is a time for all revolutionary, democratic and nationality movements, like the ones in Kashmir and the Northeast to unite, and something will come out of this unity. We have very little expectations of the State and the comprador class that it represents.

Sankarshan Thakur
Mar 31 , 2007

Tehelka

Arundathi Roy Interview – It’s outright war and both sides are choosing their weapons’

March 27, 2007

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

‘It’s outright war and both sides are choosing their weapons’

Chhattisgarh. Jharkhand. Bihar. Andhra Pradesh. Signposts of fractures gone too far with too little remedy. Arundhati Roy in conversation with Shoma Chaudhury on the violence rending our heartland

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There is an atmosphere of growing violence across the country. How do you read the signs? In what context should it be read?

You don’t have to be a genius to read the signs. We have a growing middle class, reared on a diet of radical consumerism and aggressive greed. Unlike industrialising Western countries, which had colonies from which to plunder resources and generate slave labour to feed this process, we have to colonise ourselves, our own nether parts. We’ve begun to eat our own limbs. The greed that is being generated (and marketed as a value interchangeable with nationalism) can only be sated by grabbing land, water and resources from the vulnerable. What we’re witnessing is the most successful secessionist struggle ever waged in independent India — the secession of the middle and upper classes from the rest of the country. It’s a vertical secession, not a lateral one.They’re fighting for the right to merge with the world’s elite somewhere up there in the stratosphere.

They’ve managed to commandeer the resources, the coal, the minerals, the bauxite, the water and electricity. Now they want the land to make more cars, more bombs, more mines — supertoys for the new supercitizens of the new superpower. So it’s outright war, and people on both sides are choosing their weapons. The government and the corporations reach for structural adjustment, the World Bank, the ADB, FDI, friendly court orders, friendly policy makers, help from the ‘friendly’ corporate media and a police force that will ram all this down people’s throats.

Those who want to resist this process have, until now, reached for dharnas, hunger strikes, satyagraha, the courts and what they thought was friendly media. But now more and more are reaching for guns. Will the violence grow? If the ‘growth rate’ and the Sensex are going to be the only barometers the government uses to measure progress and the well-being of people, then of course it will. How do I read the signs? It isn’t hard to read sky-writing. What it says up there, in big letters, is this: the shit has hit the fan, folks.

You once remarked that though you may not resort to violence yourself, you think it has become immoral to condemn it, given the circumstances in the country. Can you elaborate on this view?

I’d be a liability as a guerrilla! I doubt I used the word ‘immoral’ — morality is an elusive business, as changeable as the weather. What I feel is this: non-violent movements have knocked at the door of every democratic institution in this country for decades, and have been spurned and humiliated. Look at the Bhopal gas victims, the Narmada Bachao Andolan. The nba had a lot going for it — high-profile leadership, media coverage, more resources than any other mass movement.

What went wrong? People are bound to want to rethink strategy. When Sonia Gandhi begins to promote satyagraha at the World Economic Forum in Davos, it’s time for us to sit up and think. For example, is mass civil disobedience possible within the structure of a democratic nation state? Is it possible in the age of disinformation and corporate-controlled mass media? Are hunger strikes umbilically linked to celebrity politics? Would anybody care if the people of Nangla Machhi or Bhatti mines went on a hunger strike? Irom Sharmila has been on a hunger strike for six years. That should be a lesson to many of us. I’ve always felt that it’s ironic that hunger strikes are used as a political weapon in a land where most people go hungry anyway. We are in a different time and place now.

Up against a different, more complex adversary. We’ve entered the era of NGOs — or should I say the era of paltu shers — in which mass action can be a treacherous business. We have demonstrations which are funded, we have sponsored dharnas and social forums which make militant postures but never follow up on what they preach. We have all kinds of ‘virtual’ resistance. Meetings against SEZs sponsored by the biggest promoters of SEZs. Awards and grants for environmental activism and community action given by corporations responsible for devastating whole ecosystems. Vedanta, a company mining bauxite in the forests of Orissa, wants to start a university.

The Tatas have two charitable trusts that directly and indirectly fund activists and mass movements across the country. Could that be why Singur has drawn so much less flak than Nandigram? Of course the Tatas and Birlas funded Gandhi too — maybe he was our first NGO. But now we have NGOs who make a lot of noise, write a lot of reports, but whom the sarkar is more than comfortable with. How do we make sense of all this? The place is crawling with professional diffusers of real political action. ‘Virtual’ resistance has become something of a liability.

We are in the era of sponsored dharnas and NGOs the sarkar is comfortable with. The place is crawling with professional diffusers of real political action
There was a time when mass movements looked to the courts for justice. The courts have rained down a series of judgements that are so unjust, so insulting to the poor in the language they use, they take your breath away. A recent Supreme Court judgement, allowing the Vasant Kunj Mall to resume construction though it didn’t have the requisite clearances, said in so many words that the questions of corporations indulging in malpractice does not arise! In the ERA of corporate globalisation, corporate land-grab, in the ERA of Enron and Monsanto, Halliburton and Bechtel, that’s a loaded thing to say. It exposes the ideological heart of the most powerful institution in this country. The judiciary, along with the corporate press, is now seen as the lynchpin of the neo-liberal project.

In a climate like this, when people feel that they are being worn down, exhausted by these interminable ‘democratic’ processes, only to be eventually humiliated, what are they supposed to do? Of course it isn’t as though the only options are binary — violence versus non-violence. There are political parties that believe in armed struggle but only as one part of their overall political strategy. Political workers in these struggles have been dealt with brutally, killed, beaten, imprisoned under false charges. People are fully aware that to take to arms is to call down upon yourself the myriad forms of the violence of the Indian State. The minute armed struggle becomes a strategy, your whole world shrinks and the colours fade to black and white. But when people decide to take that step because every other option has ended in despair, should we condemn them? Does anyone believe that if the people of Nandigram had held a dharna and sung songs, the West Bengal government would have backed down? We are living in times when to be ineffective is to support the status quo (which no doubt suits some of us). And being effective comes at a terrible price. I find it hard to condemn people who are prepared to pay that price.

You have been travelling a lot on the ground — can you give us a sense of the trouble spots you have been to? Can you outline a few of the combat lines in these places?

Huge question — what can I say? The military occupation of Kashmir, neo-fascism in Gujarat, civil war in Chhattisgarh, mncs raping Orissa, the submergence of hundreds of villages in the Narmada Valley, people living on the edge of absolute starvation, the devastation of forest land, the Bhopal victims living to see the West Bengal government re-wooing Union Carbide — now calling itself Dow Chemicals — in Nandigram. I haven’t been recently to Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, but we know about the almost hundred thousand farmers who have killed themselves.

We know about the fake encounters and the terrible repression in Andhra Pradesh. Each of these places has its own particular history, economy, ecology. None is amenable to easy analysis. And yet there is connecting tissue, there are huge international cultural and economic pressures being brought to bear on them. How can I not mention the Hindutva project, spreading its poison sub-cutaneously, waiting to erupt once again? I’d say the biggest indictment of all is that we are still a country, a culture, a society which continues to nurture and practice the notion of untouchability. While our economists number-crunch and boast about the growth rate, a million people — human scavengers — earn their living carrying several kilos of other people’s shit on their heads every day. And if they didn’t carry shit on their heads they would starve to death. Some f***ing superpower this.

How does one view the recent State and police violence in Bengal?

No different from police and State violence anywhere else — including the issue of hypocrisy and doublespeak so perfected by all political parties including the mainstream Left. Are Communist bullets different from capitalist ones? Odd things are happening. It snowed in Saudi Arabia. Owls are out in broad daylight. The Chinese government tabled a bill sanctioning the right to private property. I don’t know if all of this has to do with climate change. The Chinese Communists are turning out to be the biggest capitalists of the 21st century. Why should we expect our own parliamentary Left to be any different? Nandigram and Singur are clear signals. It makes you wonder — is the last stop of every revolution advanced capitalism?

Think about it — the French Revolution, the Russian Revolution, the Chinese Revolution, the Vietnam War, the anti-apartheid struggle, the supposedly Gandhian freedom struggle in India… what’s the last station they all pull in at? Is this the end of imagination?These are times when to be ineffective is to support the status quo. And being effective comes at a terrible price

The Maoist attack in Bijapur — the death of 55 policemen. Are the rebels only the flip side of the State?

How can the rebels be the flip side of the State? Would anybody say that those who fought against apartheid — however brutal their methods — were the flip side of the State? What about those who fought the French in Algeria? Or those who fought the Nazis? Or those who fought colonial regimes? Or those who are fighting the US occupation of Iraq? Are they the flip side of the State? This facile new report-driven ‘human rights’ discourse, this meaningless condemnation game that we are all forced to play, makes politicians of us all and leaches the real politics out of everything.

However pristine we would like to be, however hard we polish our halos, the tragedy is that we have run out of pristine choices. There is a civil war in Chhattisgarh sponsored, created by the Chhattisgarh government, which is publicly pursing the Bush doctrine: if you’re not with us, you are with the terrorists. The lynchpin of this war, apart from the formal security forces, is the Salva Judum — a government-backed militia of ordinary people forced to take up arms, forced to become spos (special police officers).

The Indian State has tried this in Kashmir, in Manipur, in Nagaland. Tens of thousands have been killed, hundreds of thousands tortured, thousands have disappeared. Any banana republic would be proud of this record. Now the government wants to import these failed strategies into the heartland. Thousands of adivasis have been forcibly moved off their mineral-rich lands into police camps. Hundreds of villages have been forcibly evacuated. Those lands, rich in iron-ore, are being eyed by corporations like the Tatas and Essar. mous have been signed, but no one knows what they say. Land acquisition has begun.

This kind of thing happened in countries like Colombia — one of the most devastated countries in the world. While everybody’s eyes are fixed on the spiralling violence between government-backed militias and guerrilla squads, multinational corporations quietly make off with the mineral wealth. That’s the little piece of theatre being scripted for us in Chhattisgarh.

Of course it’s horrible that 55 policemen were killed. But they’re as much the victims of government policy as anybody else. For the government and the corporations they’re just cannon fodder — there’s plenty more where they came from. Crocodile tears will be shed, prim TV anchors will hector us for a while and then more supplies of fodder will be arranged. For the Maoist guerrillas, the police and spos they killed were the armed personnel of the Indian State, the main, hands-on perpetrators of repression, torture, custodial killings, false encounters. They’re not innocent civilians — if such a thing exists — by any stretch of imagination.

I have no doubt that the Maoists can be agents of terror and coercion too. I have no doubt they have committed unspeakable atrocities. I have no doubt they cannot lay claim to undisputed support from local people — but who can? Still, no guerrilla army can survive without local support. That’s a logistical impossibility. And the support for Maoists is growing, not diminishing. That says something. People have no choice but to align themselves on the side of whoever they think is less worse.

But to equate a resistance movement fighting against enormous injustice with the government which enforces that injustice is absurd. The government has slammed the door in the face of every attempt at non-violent resistance. When people take to arms, there is going to be all kinds of violence — revolutionary, lumpen and outright criminal. The government is responsible for the monstrous situations it creates.

‘Naxals’, ‘Maoists’, ‘outsiders’: these are terms being very loosely used these days.

‘Outsiders’ is a generic accusation used in the early stages of repression by governments who have begun to believe their own publicity and can’t imagine that their own people have risen up against them. That’s the stage the CPM is at now in Bengal, though some would say repression in Bengal is not new, it has only moved into higher gear. In any case, what’s an outsider? Who decides the borders? Are they village boundaries? Tehsil? Block? District? State? Is narrow regional and ethnic politics the new Communist mantra?

About Naxals and Maoists — well… India is about to become a police state in which everybody who disagrees with what’s going on risks being called a terrorist. Islamic terrorists have to be Islamic — so that’s not good enough to cover most of us. They need a bigger catchment area. So leaving the definition loose, undefined, is effective strategy, because the time is not far off when we’ll all be called Maoists or Naxalites, terrorists or terrorist sympathisers, and shut down by people who don’t really know or care who Maoists or Naxalites are. In villages, of course, that has begun — thousands of people are being held in jails across the country, loosely charged with being terrorists trying to overthrow the state. Who are the real Naxalites and Maoists? I’m not an authority on the subject, but here’s a very rudimentary potted history.

The Communist Party of India, the CPI, was formed in 1925. The CPI (M), or what we now call the CPM — the Communist Party Marxist — split from the CPI in 1964 and formed a separate party. Both, of course, were parliamentary political parties. In 1967, the CPM, along with a splinter group of the Congress, came to power in West Bengal.

At the time there was massive unrest among the peasantry starving in the countryside. Local CPM leaders — Kanu Sanyal and Charu Mazumdar — led a peasant uprising in the district of Naxalbari which is where the term Naxalites comes from. In 1969, the government fell and the Congress came back to power under Siddhartha Shankar Ray.

The Naxalite uprising was mercilessly crushed — Mahasweta Devi has written powerfully about this time. In 1969, the CPI (ML) — Marxist Leninist — split from the CPM. A few years later, around 1971, the CPI (ML) devolved into several parties: the CPM-ML (Liberation), largely centred in Bihar; the CPM-ML (New Democracy), functioning for the most part out of Andhra Pradesh and Bihar; the CPM-ML (Class Struggle) mainly in Bengal. These parties have been generically baptised ‘Naxalites’.

They see themselves as Marxist Leninist, not strictly speaking Maoist. They believe in elections, mass action and — when absolutely pushed to the wall or attacked — armed struggle. The MCC — the Maoist Communist Centre, at the time mostly operating in Bihar — was formed in 1968. The PW, People’s War, operational for the most part in Andhra Pradesh, was formed in 1980. Recently, in 2004, the MCC and the pw merged to form the CPI (Maoist) They believe in outright armed struggle and the overthrowing of the State. They don’t participate in elections. This is the party that is fighting the guerrilla war in Bihar, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand.

The Indian State and media largely view the Maoists as an “internal security” threat. Is this the way to look at them?

I’m sure the Maoists would be flattered to be viewed in this way.

The Maoists want to bring down the State. Given the autocratic ideology they take their inspiration from, what alternative would they set up? Wouldn’t their regime be an exploitative, autocratic, violent one as well? Isn’t their action already exploitative of ordinary people? Do they really have the support of ordinary people?

I think it’s important for us to acknowledge that both Mao and Stalin are dubious heroes with murderous pasts. Tens of millions of people were killed under their regimes. Apart from what happened in China and the Soviet Union, Pol Pot, with the support of the Chinese Communist Party (while the West looked discreetly away), wiped out two million people in Cambodia and brought millions of people to the brink of extinction from disease and starvation.

Can we pretend that China’s cultural revolution didn’t happen? Or that millions of people in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe were not victims of labour camps, torture chambers, the network of spies and informers, the secret police. The history of these regimes is just as dark as the history of Western imperialism, except for the fact that they had a shorter life-span. We cannot condemn the occupation of Iraq, Palestine and Kashmir while we remain silent about Tibet and Chechnya. I would imagine that for the Maoists, the Naxalites, as well as the mainstream Left, being honest about the past is important to strengthen people’s faith in the future. One hopes the past will not be repeated, but denying that it ever happened doesn’t help inspire confidence…

Nevertheless, the Maoists in Nepal have waged a brave and successful struggle against the monarchy. Right now, in India, the Maoists and the various Marxist-Leninist groups are leading the fight against immense injustice here. They are fighting not just the State, but feudal landlords and their armed militias. They are the only people who are making a dent. And I admire that.

It may well be that when they come to power, they will, as you say, be brutal, unjust and autocratic, or even worse than the present government. Maybe, but I’m not prepared to assume that in advance. If they are, we’ll have to fight them too. And most likely someone like myself will be the first person they’ll string up from the nearest tree — but right now, it is important to acknowledge that they are bearing the brunt of being at the forefront of resistance. Many of us are in a position where we are beginning to align ourselves on the side of those who we know have no place for us in their religious or ideological imagination.

It’s true that everybody changes radically when they come to power — look at Mandela’s anc. Corrupt, capitalist, bowing to the imf, driving the poor out of their homes — honouring Suharto, the killer of hundreds of thousands of Indonesian Communists, with South Africa’s highest civilian award. Who would have thought it could happen? But does this mean South Africans should have backed away from the struggle against apartheid? Or that they should regret it now? Does it mean Algeria should have remained a French colony, that Kashmiris, Iraqis and Palestinians should accept military occupation? That people whose dignity is being assaulted should give up the fight because they can’t find saints to lead them into battle?

Is there a communication breakdown in our society?

Yes.

Tehelka

Naxal leader Merugu Sambaiah surrenders

March 27, 2007

Naxal leader Merugu Sambaiah surrenders
Monday March 26 2007 12:01 IST

WARANGAL: Most wanted Maoist naxal leader Durgam Ramanaiah alias Dilip alias Masa alias Ravi (30) along with his wife Bellamkonda Sarakka and another senior leader Merugu Sambaiah surrendered to the police in the presence of Superintendent of Police Soumya Mishra. He was said to be invloved in the Koraput jailbreak in 2004, in the attack on the security establishments the same night and on the police station at Eturunagaram in Warangal district.

Merugu Sambaiah (55) alias Suramma alias Naganna, associated with the movement for about three decades is secretary of the West Bastar division committee and member of Dandakaranya Special Zonal Committee (DKSZC). He is also one of the organisers of Maoist party mobile political academic school and carryies a reward of Rs 2 lakh on his head.

Bellamkonda Sarakka alias Kala (24), is commander of Chaitanya Natya Manch of Maoist party in DKSZC operating in Chattisgarh. Ramanaiah is currently the Central Military Commission (CMC) instructor and is responsible for conducting military training camps for the cadre and top leaders of the Maoist party. He escaped with five weapons after the jailbreak in Koraput.

Ramanaiah, a native of Tadvai mandal was attracted to party since his school days at Eturunagaram in 1993. He joined the Radical Students Union (RSU) and became a full-time member later. He worked in Nallamalla forest area, North Telangana Special Zonal Committee (NTSZC) and DKSZC, Central Regional Bureau (CRB) and Central Military Commission in various capacities. He carries a reward of Rs 2 lakh.

Ramanaiah was involved in the murder of Yellandu market committee chairman Sesharaju Goud and snatching of walkie-talkies from Kothagudem Thermal Power Station, Paloncha in Khammam district.

Following ill-health and to look after his ageing parents, he decided to come out to join the mainstream.

Sambaiah who has been associated with the movement since 1975 and when the party was founded in 1980 is a contemporary of party founder Kondapalli Seetaramaiah and worked with him for long.

A native of Nallabelli village in Sangam Mandal in Warangal district, Sambaiah went underground in 1980 and was shifted to Bastar in 1982 where he worked as National Park Area Committee commander.

He was arrested by the Andhra Pradesh Police at Manguru in 1984 when he came to secure weapons at Hyderabad. After his release in 1990, he organised Rythu Coolie Sangham meetings.

He again went underground and became National Park area sub divisional committee member.

Sarakka alias Kala (24), a native of Medaram village, Karimnagar district joined the Maoist party in 1997 and had been active in Jana Natya Mandali as a member. An orphan, she joined the party to avoid a forced marriage at home by her relatives.

Another Maoist who gave up arms was Dara Saraiah alias Sekhar (30), native of Munipalli village, Hasanparthy Mandal in Warangal district. He is involved in the killing of a teacher Avula Kattaiah in Munipalli village in 2006.

According to the SP, the Warangal district stood in the forefront in extending rehabilitation package to the surrendered cadre of various naxal groups in the State.

Link

Voltaire Quote

March 24, 2007

Voltaire quote on madness

“Madness is to think of too many things in succession too fast, or of one thing too exclusively” – Voltaire

Naxal ! Naxal ! Everywhere, Oh ! What a sight to see !

March 24, 2007

Naxal ! Naxal ! Everywhere, Oh ! What a sight to see !

The ruling class tyrants and their lackeys have of late begun to
suffer from mass delusions and paranoia. So great is their
paranoia that they have begun to imagine naxalites anywhere
and everywhere.These attacks of madness have only
increased in their frequency and intensity in the last one year.

One begins to wonder if we are slowly slipping into an era
similar to that of the psycopathic lunatic tyrant Indira Gandhi ?
who always imagined that an invisible hand was trying
to molest her and one day when she finally lost her mental
balance it resulted in the imposition of the emergency.

If only Indira Gandhi had visited a psychiatrist and
taken her medicine on time , so many lives need not have
been lost in the 1970’s.

The way things are going in this country I think it won’t be
long before those emergency days return.

Already emergency like conditions characterized by an
atmosphere of fear , large scale state repression ,
disappearances and murders of activists and social workers
exists in large parts of the country.

It’s only a matter of time before this same terror is
unleashed in all the major cities all over the country.

Intelligence agencies imagine scientists to be Maoists

A married couple with BARC was recently found to have an ultra-Red background by intelligence agencies. When confronted by authorities, the two did not conceal their ideological leanings.

The two have since left the facility, but the incident has shaken the security establishment over the network of activists and sympathisers that the naxals have built up among scientists.

Bhabha Atomic Research Centre(BARC)Bhabha Atomic Research centre

Security agencies recently unearthed an R&D unit of naxalites near Bhopal and found that a number of such wings were running in different parts of India.

The extent of naxals’ efforts to run their own R&D unit was revealed by the government in Lok Sabha on Tuesday, only two days before Maoists used an improved version of petrol bombs against policemen. Though naxals had used such bombs earlier, preliminary reports of the attack revealed their more potent use, indicating Maoist expertise in making the conventional bomb more deadly.

link

ISRO refuses to launch satellites for Maoists. Maoists plan to issue global tenders

March 24, 2007

News has reached me that under government pressure ISRO has
refused to launch a satellite which is currently being fabricated by
the Maoists in the dense jungles of Dandarkarnaya.

The Maoists I believe have now decided to issue global tenders
and plan to approach several International Space agencies.

The launch is expected to take place by the end of this year 2007.


Cartoon


Maoist paranoia extends to Judiciary

March 24, 2007

After the Supreme court came out with veiled praise of
Maoists, Hang corrupt people in public: SC
it is now only a matter of time before judges
are accused of being Maoist sympathisers.

After undertaking a comprehensive study measuring the tensile
strength of lamp posts all over India and study of BMI of
potential candidates the Maoists I believe have come to the
firm conclusion that it is not viable to hang all of them by lamp
posts.

Morever what the report states as a conclusion is that
it is more likely is that we will run out of lamp posts before we
run out of corrupt people in this country.

Cartoons courtesy of Mr Govindan Kutty

Lamp post Cartoon I

Lamp post Cartoon 2

Maoists warn of more attacks

March 24, 2007

Maoists warn of more attacks

Special Correspondent

HYDERABAD: Adopting a belligerent stand against the counter-revolutionary movement, Salwa Judum, the Maoists warned that it would step up attacks against security forces and the special police officers employed by the Chhattisgarh Government.

Terming the recent Rani Bodli attack, in which 55 security personnel were killed in Chhattisgarh, a “heroic tactical counter-offensive” operation, the Maoist spokesperson Azad warned that the Maoist guerillas and militia were prepared even to take on the Indian Army, if it was deployed in the Chhattisgarh forests.

In a two-page statement issued here on Friday, Azad described the attack as “an inevitable consequence” of state-sponsored reign of terror in the Bastar forests. He accused the Government of planning to deploy the Army and carry out aerial bombardment of villages and the People’s Liberation Guerilla Army (PLGA) locations in Chhattisgarh.

Maintaining that rebel forces, assisted by the Bhoomkal militia, would take up attacks on a bigger scale if the Salwa Judum campaign was not withdrawn, he appealed to the tribal youth participating in the counter-revolutionary activity to realise that they were being pitted against their own tribesmen by the Government.

The Maoist leader also appealed to the jawans of Central forces, particularly the Naga and Mizo battalions, to disobey the orders and withdraw from Chhattisgarh.He claimed that several jawans were forced to commit suicide due to mental stress, while over 30 died of malaria.

Link

Maoists conclude successful Rally in Ranchi,Jharkhand

March 24, 2007

Naxal-sponsored rally in capital huge success

RANCHI: The state police remained on high alert on Friday in a bid to prevent Naxal outfits participating in a rally organised at the Morhabadi Ground to mark the anti-imperialist day.

The rally organised by various democratic-socio-cultural organisations of Naxals was also attended by several frontal organisations of extremists hailing from Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, West Bengal and Orissa.

Talking to TOI, DGP JB Mahapatra said the police had information about Naxal outfits sponsoring the rally and it was maintaining a strict vigil.

“We did everything except restricting the rally,” he said. Police also prevented some of the vehicles entering the capital from the Ranchi-Lohardagga route and even the rally was escorted by police force while it moved on the thoroughfares of the city.

Prior to this, the congregation of different democratic fronts held a preliminary meeting and declared a charter of Ranchi convention.

Announcing the formation of a nine-member steering committee under the chairmanship of Bramhadeo Sharma of Bharat Jan Andolan, convener of the meeting and noted social worker of Andhra Pradesh GN SaiBaba said, “They have rejected the present model of development and chalked out an annual programme to be adopted at the national-level”
Beginning with mass rally in Chattisgarh, Orissa and Polabaram in AP the newly-formed steering committee has decided to gherao the Parliament in October in which artists and intelligentsia will participate in a large number.

The forum has also given a call for an all India bandh in October but the date is yet to be finalised. Sharma said the forum is against the concept of state-owned resources and will make all efforts to reinstate people’s right over natural resources.

The government is only the custodian of resources and transfers ownership to multinational companies at its own wish setting aside the concern of poor and downtrodden and this will no longer be tolerated, he said.

Working on distinct platforms in different states against oppressive moves of state government, the forum was seen as a major development in which the participants vowed to cooperate each other during upheavals.

Literature on different extremist movements and success stories of comrades was available during the two-day programme which concluded here with the rally.

Elaborate discussions werealso held prior to the rally on people’s resistance in Singur and Dandyakarni and elimination of villagers by forcing them into armed rebellion like Salwa Judum of Chhattisgarh.

Link

Parliamentary naxalites come closer

March 24, 2007

Parliamentary Naxalites come closer

Statesman News Service

KOLKATA, March 23: The recent developments in Singur and Nandigram have given mainstream Naxalite groups an opportunity to come together and form an alliance to combat state-sponsored terrorism in the state and other parts of the country.

The groups which differ from each other on most political and economic issues, have already initiated dialogues on the formation of a Revolutionary Left Democratic Forum, said Mr KN Ramachandran, central executive member of the CPI-ML. He addressed a Press conference at Kolkata Press club on Nandigram and Singur issue today.

Top leaders of the party including Mr Kanu Sanyal are discussing with the chiefs of other CPI-ML groups about the need to form a “people’s front” in the country. He, however, made it clear that CPI-Maoist, should not be included in the front, if formed.

Link

Bhagat Singh Quote

March 23, 2007

Bhagat Singh Quotes

bhagat singh poster cenentary

Let us declare that the state of war does exist and shall exist so long as the Indian toiling masses and the natural resources are being exploited by a handful of parasites. They may be purely British Capitalist or mixed British and Indian or even purely Indian. They may be carrying on their insidious exploitation through mixed or even on purely Indian bureaucratic apparatus. All these things make no difference. “…..The war neither began with us nor is it going to end with our lives.”

– Comrade Bhagat Singh

More quotes are available on wikiquote
http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Bhagat_Singh

Thanks to http://arasubalraj.blogspot.com/ for making the effort to put
Comrade Bhagat singh’s quotes online

Today is March 23rd and it is the 76th martyrdom day of Comrade Bhagat Singh.
His 100th birth anniversary will be later this year on September 28th.
To commemorate this occasion I have two articles written by Com Bhagat Singh in the below posts.

More articles are available at the Marxists Internet Archives

collage
http://www.marxists.org/archive/bhagat-singh/


Bhagat Singh on the slogan of ‘Long Live Revolution’

March 23, 2007

From Bhagat Singh

On the slogan of ‘Long Live Revolution’

[Shri Ramanand Chatterji the editor of Modern Review, ridiculed the slogan of ‘Long Live Revolution’ through an editorial note and gave an entirely wrong interpretation. Bhagat Singh wrote a reply and handed it over to the trying magistrate to be sent to Modern Review. This was published in The Tribune of December 24, 1929.]

https://i2.wp.com/pd.cpim.org/2006/0319/bhagat-singh-ph-2.gif



To

The Editor, Modern Review

You have in the December (1929) issue of your esteemed magazine, written a note under the caption “Long Live Revolution” and have pointed out the meaninglessness of this phrase. It would be impertinent on our part to try to refute or contradict the statement of such an old, experienced and renowned journalist as your noble self, for whom every enlightened Indian has profound admiration. Still we feel it our duty to explain what we desire to convey by the said phrase, as in a way it fell to our lot to give these “cries” a publicity in this country at this stage.

We are not the originators of this cry. The same cry had been used in Russain revolutionary movement. Upton Sinclair, the well known socialist writer, has, in his recent novels Boston and Oil, used this cry through some of the anarchist revolutionary characters. The phrase never means that the sanguinary strife should ever continue, or that nothing should ever be stationary even for a short while. By long usage this cry achieves a significicance which may not be quite justifiable from the grammatical or the etymological point of view, but nevertheless we cannot abstract from that the association of ideas connected with that.

All such shouts denote a general sense which is partly acquired and partly inherent in them. For instance, when we shout “Long Live Jatin Das”, we cannot and do not mean thereby that Das should Physically be alive. What we mean by that shout is that the noble ideal of his life, the indomitable spirit which enabled that great martyr to bear such untold suffering and to make the extreme sacrifice for that we may show the same unfailing courage in persuance of our ideal. It is that spirit that we allude to.

Simiarly, one should not interpret the word “Revolution” in its literal sense. Various meanings and significances are attributed to this word, according to the interests of those who use or misuse it. For the established agencies of exploitation it conjures up a feeling of blood stained horror. To the revolutionaries it is a sacred phrase. We tried to clear in our statement before the Session Judge, Delhi , in our trial in the Assembly Bomb Case, what we mean by the word “Revolution”.

We stated therein that Revolution did not necessarily involve sanguinary strife. It was not a cult of bomb and pistol. They may sometimes be mere means for its achievement. No doubt they play a prominent part in some movements, but they do not – for that very reason -become one and the same thing. A rebellion is not a revolution. It may ultimately lead to that end.

The sense in which the word Revolution is used in that phrase, is the spirit, the longing for a change for the better. The people generally get accustomed to the established order of things and begin to tremble at the very idea of a change. It is this lethargical spirit that needs be replaced by the revolutionary spirit. Otherwise degeneration gains the upper hand and the whole humanity is led stray by the reactionary forces. Such a state of affiars leads to stagnation and paralysis in human progress. The spirit of Revolution should always permeate the soul of humanity, so that the reactionary forces may not accumulate (strength) to check its eternal onward march. Old order should change, always and ever, yielding place to new, so that one “good” order may not corrupt the world. It is in this sense that we raise the shout “Long Live Revolution.”

Yours sincerely

Bhagat Singh

B. K. Dutt

Source: CPI(M-L)KS

Content of the Leaflet thrown in the Central Assembly Hall by Bhagat Singh

March 23, 2007

Content of the Leaflet thrown in the Central Assembly Hall by Bhagat Singh

“It takes a loud voice to make the deaf hear, with these immortal words uttered on a similar occasion by Valiant, a French anarchist martyr, do we strongly justify this action of ours.”

“Without repeating the humiliating history of the past ten years of the working of the reforms (Montague-Chelmsford Reforms) and without mentioning the insults hurled at the Indian nation through this House-the so-called Indian Parliament-we want to point out that, while the people expecting some more crumbs of reforms from the Simon Commission, and are ever quarrelling over the distribution of the expected bones, the Government is thrusting upon us new repressive measures like the Public Safety and the Trade Disputes Bill, while reserving the Press Sedition Bill for the next session. The indiscriminate arrests of labour leaders working in the open field clearly indicate whither the wind blows.”

“In these extremely provocative circumstances, the Hindustan Socialist Republican Association, in all seriousness, realizing their full responsibility, had decided and ordered its army to do this particular action, so that a stop be put to this humiliating farce and to let the alien bureaucratic exploiters do what they wish, but they must be made to come before the public eve in their naked form.”

“Let the representatives of the people return to their constituencies and prepare the masses for the coming revolution, and let the Government know that while protesting against the Public Safety and Trade Disputes Bills and the callous murder of Lala Lajpat Rai, on behalf of the helpless Indian masses, we want to emphasize the lesson often repeated by history, that it is easy to kill individuals but you connot kill the ideas Great empires crumbled while the ideas survived. Bourbons and Czars fell. While the revolution marched ahead triumphantly.”

“We are sorry to admit that we who attach so great a sanctity to human life, who dream of a glorious future, when man will be enjoying perfect peace and full liberty, have been forced to shed human blood. But the sacrifice of individuals at the altar of the ‘Great Revolution’ that will bring freedom to all, rendering the exploitation of man by man impossible, is inevitable.”

“Long Live the Revolution.”

Hindustan Socialist Republican Army


Source – CPI(M-L)KS

Nandigram rape: CPM man owns up

March 23, 2007

The Statesman (Wednesday, 21 March 2007 )
Nandigram rape: CPM man owns up

Joydeep Thakur

NANDIGRAM, March 20: Villagers have been looking for some people who came in on 14 March disguised as policemen to rape and murder women. They chanced upon Sahadev Pramanick (30), who had raped at least two women.

The CPI-M activist from Gangra, Sonachura, left the village after the first spell of violence in January and sought refuge in a party camp at Khejuri. Last evening, whilst trying to sneak into Sonachura along with four accomplices, he found himself captured. Pramanick admitted to two rapes, including that of a 13-year-old girl. “

At least 17 girls were raped inside a deserted house near Bhangabera on 14 March when police opened fire near a bridge. The victims were dragged into the house of Shankar Samanta by CPI-M cadres,”

CBI officials have visited it, collecting pieces of torn cloth, bangles and undergarments. It was also stained with blood. Villagers had heard women forced into the house cry out in agony but there were CPI-M goons guarding it. Haldia’s sub-divisional police officer, Mr Swapan Saha, said if the CBI wanted Pramanick for interrogation, he would be handed over to it.

We thank Comrade Dreamer for providing us with this link

One CPM MP along with a CPM zilla parishad officer and two IPS officers planned Nandigram massacre

March 23, 2007

One CPM MP along with a CPM zilla parishad officer and two IPS
officers planned Nandigram massacre

Ajanta Chakraborty

KOLKATA: How does it feel to be party to a mass-murder masterminded by politicians? Or — precisely — to be branded as “killers-in-uniform” by just about everyone, including one’s own family?

The questions weren’t actually posed to three policemen TOI spoke to. For, these men in khaki who had participated in what they described as the “party-police combine carnage” on March 14, have been going through a lot of self-questioning ever since their return from battlefield Nandigram.

“It feels terrible looking at those TV footage — knowing that we were involved in the bloodbath,” one of the cops said as he recounted the “joint operation” by the police and local CPM. “Four heads had got together and schemed Operation Nandigram. They had outlined how the police would begin dispersing the crowd first and how the hired criminals would take over after that,” claimed one of the three cops TOI spoke to.

The “core team” comprised a CPM MP, a zilla parishad leader and two senior IPS officials. “The IPS officers took their orders from the two CPM leaders. We learnt about the gameplan later, but we hadn’t the slightest clue about it on the morning of March 14,” claimed another policeman.

“As men, women and chil dren ran for their lives, they were grabbed by CPM’s hired goondas, a few kiliometres from the firing spot. Some men and women were killed instantly. “We also have information about women being raped. The goons (in groups of six to eight) were hiding at strategic points so that they could overpower the fleeing men and women,” said one of the three cops.

He recounted in horror: “The women cried for help, but no one came forward. Their menfolk retaliated, killing some of the criminals who were later to be projected as missing CPM men.” All the three cops corroborated that “IG (western range) Arun Gupta verbally ordered the firing. Yet, after the carnage, he started shouting: ‘Who gave you the authority to fire?’ The constables told him ‘the IG did’, not knowing that they were actually talking to the IG himself.”

Link